Hai Tac Pirates Archipelago

In December 2017, the Kiên Giang People’s Committee recognised the archipelago as a local tourism site.

Tien Hai is the only island commune in Ha Tien District, the southern province of Kien Giang. The commune also has another name: Hai Tac (Pirates) Archipelago. It boasts 16 islands and the total area of 283ha. In the past few years, the island commune has developed community tourism models, making contributions to socio-economic development for Ha Tien District. In December 2017, the Kien Giang People’s Committee recognized the archipelago as a local tourism site.   

Tourists coming to Ha Tien District are always curious about the Hai Tac archipelago, a famed place in the southwest sea of the country. According to local historic documents from the 17th century, Mạc Thiên Tích, a leader of the region, many times ordered his troops to fight against local pirates, who lived in the area. The archipelago name Hai Tac originated from that time.

Besides its mysterious name, Tien Hai island commune has great potential for developing tourism thanks to its primitive landscapes, fresh and cool atmosphere. In order to utilize the tourism potential, in 2014 the local authorities implemented a community tourism project for the period 2014-2020. The commune consists of 16 large and small islands, locating 20km from Ha Tien Town and 40km from Phu Quoc Island.

The commune hosts 500 families with 2,000 people, who live mainly in Hon Tre Lon, Hon Giang, Hon Duoc and Hon Ụ. The biggest among the islands is Hon Tre Lon (also known as Hon Đoc), which is an administration and socio-economic center for the Tien Hai island commune. All people and agencies in the commune are informed about the project and encouraged to join involuntarily.

Hon Tre Village was chosen as a trial model with 17 families, who meet the requirements, to join the community tourism project. Eleven households among them offer food and accommodation services, four households have acted as guides to take visitors to islands and fishing, and two households keep sea fish for visitors to understand raising local fish. Two companies have been specialized in transporting tourists to and from the mainland.  Over the last three years, the project has brought along active results.

The number of guests coming every year has significantly increased and is now up to 70,000 tourists per year. A visitor from Rach Gia City northern province of Kien Giang said she spent two vacations in the area. What I like most when stay at the home of locals in Tien Hai is that I can live near them, see their routines and imagine as if I were a local, she said. However, the area is still lack of freshwater and electricity. By 2020, the national electricity system will reach the islands and tourism service will be better. “Its name “Hai Tac” (Pirates) is scary but actually the islands are beautiful in peace and many romantic beaches with white sand and blue water run long,” Phượng said.

Hai Viet, an old resident on Hon Tre Vinh Island recalled his grandfather’s story on the pirates. “There was once a pirate group named Canh Buom Den (Black Sail) on this island,” he said, “They mostly robbed trading ships passing Ha Tien – Rach Gia Bay. “On the pirates’ ship hung a mop, meaning sweeping off all ships passing by. “The gang controlled a big sea area of the Gulf of Thailand. Up to now, there are still rumors of treasure hidden by the pirates somewhere on this archipelago,” he said. Many locals still believe there is treasure hidden on Hon Doc and scattering around the archipelago.

The only ancient mark on the island is a pagoda named Son Hoa Tu. It is said that once there was ahead of a pirate gang named Nguyễn Thanh Vân. Rumors say he was strong, was a brilliant swimmer and could dive as well as an otter, rebellious but at the same time, had a kind heart. Once his gang traveled to Thailand, he fell in love with a beautiful woman and took her to Vietnam. Since then, he quit the pirate life. They had a daughter called Nguyễn Thị Gái, who was then respected by locals as she built the only pagoda on the islands. The Son Hoa Tu Pagoda remains up to now as an evidence of rumors on local pirates, a special attraction for tourists to the pristine islands. — VNS”

Read more: Intercontinental Phu Quoc Resort

Liveinmuine.com providing a reliable and affordable hotel transfer service. We operating all over Vietnam. You’ll get a direct door-to-door transfer directly to your destination. Whether it’s an airport, port, train station, town or city we have the right vehicle for you. So, tell us where and when you’d like to go, whatever time day or night our vehicles could be available to suit all your needs. Moreover, check also sightseeing tours, personal driver service, and Muine quality accommodation options. Thank you!

Phu Quoc Vietnam’s Maldives

Take a summer trip to Vietnam's 'Maldives' Phu Quoc Island boasts sandy beaches, turquoise waters, historic relics, fresh seafood and more.

Phu Quoc Island boasts sandy beaches, turquoise waters, historic relics, fresh seafood and more. Lying on the southern coast off the Mekong Delta province of Kien Giang, Phu Quoc has become one of the top holiday destinations in Vietnam. Vietnam’s largest island has recently been named one of the most beautiful places in the country by U.S. news site CNN. However, the beach paradise has kept its best secrets awaiting to be discovered. With the summer vacation season calling, allow us to plan you a four-day trip to catch the best of the amazing island, dubbed ‘Vietnam’s Maldives’.

For a castaway-esque experience, head east to one of the oldest fishing villages on the glamorous island that lies just 20 kilometers to the south of Duong Dong Town, the capital of Phu Quoc. It is no exaggeration to call Ham Ninh a priceless jewel with pristine charm and beauty that has luckily escaped the tourism boom raging on Vietnam’s largest island. Locals still live in the same thatched houses and catch shrimp, fish, pearls and sea cucumbers to earn a living. Travel tip: Sunrise is the best time to stroll around Ham Ninh, and don’t forget to bring your camera with you to capture the best of the fishing village.

On the second day, wake up early to make your way to Sao Beach, one of the top beaches on Phu Quoc and dubbed as “crown jewel” of the pearl island by the U.K.’s Telegraph. From the downtown, hop in a taxi for around VND300,000 ($13) to get to the beach that boasts crystal blue water and stretches of soft white sand. A bit of advice: buy a package tour for VND550,000 ($24) per person for hands-on experience. The tour includes a 30-minute motorboat ride, snorkeling on the coral reef and squid-fishing at night.

Once branded “Hell on Earth” for its notorious jail, Phu Quoc Prison is living witness to the most horrifying scenes of oppression during wartime that has left mysterious and creepy stories behind. A tour here will render every heart heavy but will make your trip a lot more memorable. And don’t miss a chance to drop by Dinh Cau (Cau Temple), which is just 25 kilometers from the prison. Get lost and allow your breath to be taken away as the sun goes down over the shimmering water. Prepare to take your wallet with you for a night trip to the Phu Quoc night market, which has around 50 food stalls serving a wide range of Vietnamese seafood. It is a great place for anyone who wants to go out for a late bite.

Leaving the noisy downtown behind, pack up and head north around 20 kilometers to Ganh Dau Cape, one of the few inhabited and secluded gems on Phu Quoc. It would be a waste of a trip not to set foot on Ganh Dau and enjoy the fresh air and peaceful atmosphere. Tourism is not yet a popular term here, so services are still underdeveloped. Don’t expect a fancy world of restaurants and bars, but instead try little homestay facilities willing to treat you to exotic seafood dishes. After that, take a trek through the primitive forests in Phu Quoc National Park which is home to a rich variety of fauna and flora. If you have enough time, try to conquer Chua Mountain at a height of 565 meters above sea level, considered the roof of Phu Quoc.

It’s not difficult to find all the local specialties in markets on Phu Quoc. Among them are honey, pearls, fish sauce, pepper and Rose Myrtle wine.

If you’re a fan of straight-from-the-sea food, the best time to touch down in Phu Quoc Island is between May and November which is the fishing season. But if you wish to get a true taste of Phu Quoc’s culinary world, do not miss a noodle soup called “bun quay,” or stirred noodles, at the intersection of Tran Phu and Cach Mang Thang Tam, raw herring salad served with Phu Quoc’s fish sauce on Tran Hung Dao Street, and thick noodles with mackerel on Bach Dang Street. Plus, several famous restaurants in Phu Quoc that you should note down are Com Bac 123 on April 30 Street, Hello on Tran Hung Dao Street, and Quoc Anh on Bach Dang Street.

From Hanoi and Saigon, the best way to reach Phu Quoc, which was named among the top 10 destinations in Southeast Asia by the U.K. travel magazine Rough Guides, is flying. Vietnam Airlines and Vietjet Air have direct flights to Phu Quoc every day. Return tickets usually cost VND1 million ($44) from HCMC and VND2 million from Hanoi.

Phu Quoc International Airport stands around five kilometers (three miles) from the downtown. You can take a shuttle bus from the airport or call a cab to get into the town center. Those who start their trips from HCMC can also opt for a sleeper coach to Rach Gia or Ha Tien, and then take a high-speed boat. It takes six to eight hours by coach and costs from VND150,000 to VND190,000. High-speed boat tours are available at 8 a.m. and 8.45 a.m. every day with tickets priced at VND340,000 per person. A bit of advice: book your tickets in advance during the peak travel season to avoid higher costs. Once in town, you can hire motorbikes for VND120,000-150,000 per day or book a car for around VND750,000 per day if you’re traveling in a group of five to seven. You can ask your hotel or homestay to help you with this.

For accommodations, a number of four-star hotels and resorts scattered around Duong Dong Town, the capital of Phu Quoc, cost from VND1.5 million per night for two people. For cheaper options, take a look at the hotels on Nguyen Dinh Chieu, April 30 and Nguyen An Ninh streets, with prices ranging from VND300,000 to VND500,000 per night. Homestay services are also worth consideration. You can choose from D’Hotel, 9 Station Hotel and 88 Hilltop Hostel & Villa on Tran Hung Dao Street, and Cottage Village and Peace House along Tran Hung Dao Street. Prices range from VND150,000 to VND300,000 per night.

The best time to make a trip to Phu Quoc is between October and May, with the rain long gone and the sun shining down on crystal blue waters.  Avoid the crowds and beware of the heat and scorching sun. Phu Quoc is also home to other places of interest, including Nguyen Trung Truc Temple, Ho Quoc Pagoda, Khem Beach, Long Beach and the Rach Vem fishing village.

Read more: JW Marriott Phu Quoc Emerald Bay Resort & Spa
Radisson Blu Resort Phu Quoc

Liveinmuine.com providing a reliable and affordable hotel transfer service. We operating all over Vietnam. You’ll get a direct door-to-door transfer directly to your destination. Whether it’s an airport, port, train station, town or city we have the right vehicle for you. So, tell us where and when you’d like to go, whatever time day or night our vehicles could be available to suit all your needs. Moreover, check also sightseeing tours, personal driver service, and Muine quality accommodation options. Thank you!

Good morning Vietnam

VIETNAM passes the test of the three Cs: it’s cheap, cheerful and close – and, in these difficult times, it is safe. Vietnam will become an increasingly important destination for international tourists and has the potential to become the most popular Asian destination. It not only offers superb beaches and bargain shopping, but the Vietnamese cuisine also is a delight and the chance of picking up food bugs is minimal.  

Visitors either enter in the south at Ho Chi Minh City (it was Saigon) and slowly make their way north to the capital Hanoi or vice versa. They can use Ho Chi Minh City as a base to explore the Mekong Delta, which is the rice bowl of the country and worth an overnight trip. The meander north can include Nha Trang, a one-hour flight north from HCMC and a very relaxing beach stopover. It is similar to Bali, with hawkers on the beach to make life more bearable, selling fresh fruit, beer, T-shirts, postcards, jewelry… you name it and they sell it. Unlike Bali, however, the hawkers are usually happy to take “no” for an answer.

The next 60-minute flight took us from Nha Trang to the coastal town of Da Nang where China Beach became a famous R&R spot for troops during the Vietnam War. A 30-minute hair-raising drive from Da Nang was Hoi An, the town of tailors – almost 800 of them to be precise. They can knock up any sort of clothing in two days – suits, jackets, slacks, skirts, and shirts – and that includes at least one fitting. Prices range from about $10 for shirts up to $120 for suits and it is very competitive.

A complete wardrobe revamp could take a few days but the money saved could pay for the trip, so don’t miss Hoi An. For visitors more interested in the beach, a beautiful strip of white sand is just 5km from the town where there are several high-class resorts. A two-hour bus trip from Hoi An leads north to Hue, the ancient capital of Vietnam. A must-see for visitors is the old city and citadel which is being rebuilt after extensive damage during the war.

Fighting around Hue was intense and the town was retaken by the Vietcong during the Tet Offensive – a nationwide uprising in 1968, which claimed 1000 American and 2000 South Vietnamese army deaths while the North Vietnamese lost 32,000 troops. It was the beginning of the end of the war but it was not until 1975 that the Americans pulled out. Another 90-minute flight took us from Hue to Hanoi and back to the big-city bustle where the motorcycle is king.

Hanoi has three million people and two million motorcycles and very little in the way of road rules. It is organized chaos, as horns constantly toot and bikes dive into holes in the traffic. Little wonder that about 30 people die every day on Vietnam roads. There’s no break in the traffic, so crossing the street is an art that has to be learned quickly. It’s a case of slowly moving across the street, no sudden movements while making eye contact with oncoming drivers. The traffic flows around pedestrians. The trick is to do this while praying and avoiding the almost overwhelming temptation to panic and run.

A welcome break from Hanoi was a trip to Halong Bay – three hours by bus but a world away cruising the bay that is littered with unusual limestone rock formations. Old junks have been rebuilt to cater for six couples in cabins with their own en suites. Very civilized, and all for around $50 a head for the two days with meals thrown in. Another Hanoi sanity stopover is Sapa, an overnight train trip away in the highlands near the Chinese border.

While Hanoi and, to a lesser extent Ho Chi Minh City, are interesting, they are also heavily polluted, so it is best to spend most of a Vietnam visit in the provinces. After hundreds of years of war with the Chinese, the French, and then the Americans, the good times have finally come to these resilient and resourceful people. Vietnam is no longer at war. It’s a country going places with plenty to offer.”

Source: http://www.news.com.au

Liveinmuine.com providing a reliable and affordable hotel transfer service. We operating all over Vietnam. You’ll get a direct door-to-door transfer directly to your destination. Whether it’s an airport, port, train station, town or city we have the right vehicle for you. So, tell us where and when you’d like to go, whatever time day or night our vehicles could be available to suit all your needs. Moreover, check also sightseeing tours, personal driver service, and Muine quality accommodation options. Thank you!

HCMC coffe culture

The first thing a stranger needs to learn in Ho Chi Minh City is how to cross the road. It’s a daunting challenge that requires a fine balance of nonchalance and acute awareness, of deliberate forward motion and hesitancy. Facing down a phalanx of buzzing mopeds with riders expressionless behind helmets and masks is dizzying. It takes a while to discover that it’s a dance of giving and take; that the moped riders will flow around you; that, in the end, the last thing to do is stop. Maybe that’s the essence of Ho Chi Minh City itself.   

It’s a metropolis where it feels as though the future has burst its banks. Skyscrapers rise out of the ground, obliterating neighborhoods where family life once played out at street level. And yet, at the foot of one of these glass-and-steel monoliths sits an old lady, skin like fragile rice paper, serving steaming pho (noodle soup) from an old cart, as if nothing at all has changed.

The best way to enjoy this peculiar balancing act is to sit on the balcony of one of the innumerable coffee houses scattered throughout the city. This way you will be out of the fray but able to look down on the street hustle below. You will also be drinking the beverage that must be at least partly responsible for the kinetic energy that has transformed this city into one of the most sophisticated commercial hubs of south-east Asia in just 20 years.

On the terrace of L’Usine, a French-inspired café overlooking the opera house, I ordered the classic Vietnamese coffee known as ca phe sua da – literally “coffee, milk, ice”. It comprises strong coffee, dripped from a small metal filter into a cup containing a quarter as much sweetened condensed milk, then stirred and poured over ice in a glass.

At first, I couldn’t bear its cloying sweetness, but three days in I’d grown addicted to the sweet buzz that follows a refreshing coolness on the tongue. It suits the humidity of the place in a way that an ordinary latte wouldn’t. Coffee was introduced to Vietnam by the French in the late 19th century but the country quickly became a strong exporter, as vast swathes of the highlands were given over to this important new cash crop. And now the Vietnamese have taken coffee to new levels of almost gastronomical – even medicinal – heights.

At Trung Nguyen Coffee – the Vietnamese equivalent of Starbucks, with a chain of cafés across the city – the coffee menu stretched to five pages. The vibe was studiously chic, with low-slung sofas and Seventies retro branding in orange and brown. Fellow patrons were largely beatnik-inspired youths and businessmen.

Coffee is taken seriously here, with beans from Italy, Japan, Turkey, and Ethiopia, but it was the varieties of Vietnamese coffee that deserved more exploration. They came with different bean combinations and recipes, and lofty names such as “Success”, “Creation”, “Discover” and “Thought”. I went for the “Passiona”, which was exclusively promoted for women with the promise that to drink this nectar would be to maintain perfect skin and a life of “passion and success”.

I drank it a lot, not necessarily because of its promises but because it was delicious. A kind of coffee smoothie, it was developed over the course of nine years and included a concoction of collagen, vitamin PP (to combat skin dryness) and rare oriental herbs. It was probably a calorie overload but became for me a daily ritual while I contemplated the city’s exquisitely balanced fusion of old and new.

At Mr Huynh’s street restaurant with no name, eating his signature beef pho under neon lights, I realised that no matter how many skyscrapers rise and how many mopeds speed towards the future, Vietnam’s past lives on in its food – in the steaming pho on street corners, in the markets with fish thrashing about in gleaming steel bowls, in the mounds of rice of a dozen varieties and the heaps of freshly harvested herbs. As Mr Huynh explained, few Vietnamese people own refrigerators because they buy everything fresh from the market.

Whether rich or poor, they prefer to eat on the street on tiny stools, and every restaurant uses family recipes passed down through generations. So it is that the hunky-dory youths with mobile phones pinned to their ears park their mopeds on the pavement, pull up a stool and eat the same food as their great-great-grandmothers did, long before the Vietnam War interrupted the gathering of rice in the paddies of the Mekong.

I bought my last cup of ca phe sua da from a street vendor outside the War Remnants Museum and drank it in the shadow of an old American tank with Lou, a young Vietnamese woman who still struggled with the war. Her name, Lou, had been given to her by a much-loved aunt who was separated from her family as a girl and ended up being taken care of by a French army deserter hiding from US troops in the mountains.

She went with him to France and it took her 30 years to find her way back to her family; to achieve that, she had to leave her beloved dog behind. The visit to the museum brought up sore memories for Lou, who’d had to change her foreign-sounding name in school to protect her from hatred as she might have been thought of as mixed-race.

“Everyone here has a story,” she told me. “Everyone lost someone, and many had to live with the shame of fighting on the wrong side. We fought and killed one another. No one talks about the war any more, as if it is over, but it isn’t really. It lives on in the silence.”

So in the cacophony that is street life in Ho Chi Minh City, each person carries the past as a secret wound, offering it quietly at his or her ancestral altars but forgetting it during the daily rush and the forgiving clatter of commerce. Vietnam has been invaded by the Chinese, the Japanese, the French and, finally, the Americans. That last legacy fills the rooms of the museum, where a visit concludes with eloquent photographs and testimony from the many, many people bearing the scars and disfigurements of chemical warfare.

Lou didn’t talk about it. Neither did I. We both sipped through our straws, drawing on the sweetness of our ca phe sua da as if it might dilute the bitterness of memory and loss.”

Source: https://www.telegraph.co.uk

Liveinmuine.com providing a reliable and affordable hotel transfer service. We operating all over Vietnam. You’ll get a direct door-to-door transfer directly to your destination. Whether it’s an airport, port, train station, town or city we have the right vehicle for you. So, tell us where and when you’d like to go, whatever time day or night our vehicles could be available to suit all your needs. Moreover, check also sightseeing tours, personal driver service, and Muine quality accommodation options. Thank you!

World longest cable car

Phu Quoc to have world's longest cable car

The world longest cable car will be in Phu Quoc. A sea cable car route connecting An Thoi town and Hon Thom Island, the largest of the An Thoi island cluster to the south of Phu Quoc Island off the coast of the Mekong Delta’s Kien Giang province, will open on February 14, just before Tet. Invested by the Sun Group, its nearly 8-km length makes it the longest cable car in the world. Its 70 cars can carry 30 passengers each on a three-rope cable car technology known as 3S gondola, which is the safest and most modern in the world.

The trip provides a 360-degree of the islands and the sea. The cable car is the first and most important installation of the Sun World Hon Thom Nature Park in the southern reaches of Phu Quoc Island, another project from the Sun Group and that features a water park and entertainment park.

The cable car and the Sun World Hon Thom Nature Park will officially open to tourists on February 14, two days before Tet. Tickets for adults and children over 1.3 meters tall are VND500,000 ($22), while children from 1 meter to 1.3 meters tall pay VND350,000 ($15) and children under 1 meter travel for free. To mark the opening, a “buy 1 ticket get 1 free” offer is available to the first 500 visitors each day from February 18 to 22. A lucky draw will also be held, with smartphones, luggage and cable and food vouchers up for grabs.

The Sun Group has built many large real estate and tourism projects in Vietnam, including the world’s longest continuous mono-cable detachable gondola at Sun World Ba Na Hills in the central city of Danang, the world’s former longest 3S gondola at Mt. Fansipan in northern Lao Cai province, and the world’s tallest ropeway tower and largest ropeway cabin, the Ha Long Queen Cable Car, in Ha Long city. Situated in the Gulf of Thailand on the Vietnam-Cambodia-Thailand marine economic corridor, Phu Quoc is the country’s largest island and boasts a range of beautiful beaches.

Phu Quoc National Park, meanwhile, is home to hundreds of plant species, dozens of which are listed in the Vietnamese and world red books of endangered species. The park is part of the Kien Giang biosphere reserve, which was recognized as a World Biosphere Reserve by UNESCO in 2006. Phu Quoc Island welcomed nearly 362,000 international visitors last year, up 72 per cent against 2016, and targets at least half a million this year.” Source: vneconomictimes.com

Read more:
Intercontinental Phu Quoc Resort

Liveinmuine.com providing a reliable and affordable hotel transfer service. We operating all over Vietnam. You’ll get a direct door-to-door transfer directly to your destination. Whether it’s an airport, port, train station, town or city we have the right vehicle for you. So, tell us where and when you’d like to go, whatever time day or night our vehicles could be available to suit all your needs. Moreover, check also sightseeing tours, personal driver service, and Muine quality accommodation options. Thank you!

Saigon nightlife

SAIGON NIGHTLIFE. HCM CITY. Nightlife in the megacity has something for everyone, be it partying hard or watching the skyline with a cocktail. Respected travel site Rough Guides just released a list of eight best night experiences in Southeast Asia, and Ho Chi Minh City is named THE place to delve into bars and clubs. “When the sun goes down, the bustling energy of southern Vietnam’s megalopolis transfers to its many clubs and bars,” Rough Guides says. If you’re thirsty for a chic experience of Saigon’s nightlife, put on your best dress or suit and head to the rooftop Chill Sky Bar in District 1, one of the city’s most popular and fancy spots.

It stays open from 5:30 p.m. till small hours the next morning, offering a dusk till dawn-ish view of the city, fabulous cocktails and a small but exciting music scene to check out. The U.K travel site also named Saigon Acoustic Bar in District 3 as a great rendezvous for a night out with pop-rock cover bands, while Carmen Bar in District 1 offers an odd selection of Spanish flamenco played by skilled Vietnamese musicians. For a casual good time, the plastic tables along Bui Vien are a must, Rough Guides said, calling it the “Beer Street” of the city’s backpacker district. Bui Vien is part of the city’s famous backpacker precinct that is closed to vehicles on weekends. It has drawn much attention from nomads with its bustling and energetic atmosphere, where they wander into the world of beer clubs, bars and pubs, shaking up the night in loud music, blink lights and cheers.

Other best night experiences in the region that are named on the list are music scene in Malaysia’s Kuala Lumpur and Sarawak, an overnight stay at Thailand’s most populous city The Big Mango or dance parties in Malaysia’s Penang. Or, visitors can grab a bite at Myanmar’s former capital Yangon, indulge in street life and live music at Yogyakarta’s Malioboro strip in Indonesia and dive into Singapore’s art hub Kampong Glam. Saigon, Vietnam’s biggest commercial center, is one of the most popular destinations in the country. Official data showed that it received 6.4 million foreign arrivals in 2017, a 22 percent pickup from the previous year. The city hopes to receive seven million foreign visitors this year.” Source: e.vnexpress.net

Read more:
HCMC coffee culture

Liveinmuine.com providing a reliable and affordable hotel transfer service. We operating all over Vietnam. You’ll get a direct door-to-door transfer directly to your destination. Whether it’s an airport, port, train station, town or city we have the right vehicle for you. So, tell us where and when you’d like to go, whatever time day or night our vehicles could be available to suit all your needs. Moreover, check also sightseeing tours, personal driver service, and Muine quality accommodation options. Thank you!

Phu Quoc – Nam Du – Con Dao islands by ferry

PHU QUOC – NAM DU – CON DAO ISLANDS BY FERRY. In efforts to facilitate access to the islands in Southern Vietnam, we are partnering with Superdong Speed Ferry, the leading speed boat company that operates routes to Phu Quoc, Nam Du and Con Dao. ” Phu Quoc is the largest island in Vietnam. Located in the Gulf of Thailand, the territory belongs to Kien Giang province.

Having experienced a tourist boom, Phu Quoc has achieved fast economic growth. In the last decades, many infrastructure projects have been developed, including 5-star hotels and resorts. Also, Phu Quoc International Airport connects the island with Ho Chi Minh (baolau.com/s/Ho-Chi-Minh/Phu-Quoc) and Hanoi (baolau.com/s/Hanoi/Phu-Quoc), as well as other international destinations such as Bangkok (baolau.com/s/Bangkok/Phu-Quoc).

The beaches are the main attraction on the island. Phu Quoc offers some of the most beautiful beaches in Vietnam, including Long Beach along the western coast, Bai Sao and Bai Kem in the south, Bai Ganh Dau and Bai Dai in the north, and the An Thoi Archipelago beaches. Besides swimming, snorkeling and sun-bathing, eating seafood and watching the sunset are also the most popular activities.

Phu Quoc island is accessible from the ports of Rach Gia (baolau.com/s/Rach-Gia/Phu-Quoc) and Ha Tien (baolau.com/s/Ha-Tien/Phu-Quoc). There are combined routes of bus + ferry if coming from Can Tho (baolau.com/s/Can-Tho/Phu-Quoc) in the Mekong Delta or Sihanoukville (baolau.com/s/Sihanoukville/Phu-Quoc) in Southern Cambodia via Kep – Ha Tien international border crossing. Source: baolau.com

Read more:
JW Marriott Phu Quoc Emerald Bay Resort & Spa

Liveinmuine.com providing a reliable and affordable hotel transfer service. We operating all over Vietnam. You’ll get a direct door-to-door transfer directly to your destination. Whether it’s an airport, port, train station, town or city we have the right vehicle for you. So, tell us where and when you’d like to go, whatever time day or night our vehicles could be available to suit all your needs. Moreover, check also sightseeing tours, personal driver service, and Muine quality accommodation options. Thank you!

Hon Thom Islet

Hon Thom (Pineapple Islet) is the largest of the An Thoi Islands (An Thoi Archipelago), with a population of around 4,000. The 15 islands and islets are located to the south of Phu Quoc Island in the Gulf of Thailand and are under the authority of Kien Giang Province in the Mekong Delta.

The archipelago consists of many islands and islets that are quickly growing in popularity as tourist destinations thanks to their pristine beaches, rocky cliffs, breathtaking mountains, and dense forests. This beauty has earned it the nickname “The Paradise Islets of Phu Quoc.” However, it was only recently that any An Thoi islands besides Phu Quoc became considered as a “must-see” in Vietnam.

One of these islands, Hon Thom, stands out for its untouched natural beauty. Surrounding the island is clear blue water and sun-burned sandy beaches. The island itself is covered in wild greenery, creating a romantic aura around on its beaches. Hon Thom is well-known for the flawless sand on its many beaches, including Nom beach, Nam beach, Chuong beach, and Chao beach.

On Chuong beach, located in the south of the island, the sand is bordered on one side by small houses with metal roofs and fishing boats on the other. Moreover, the beach has plenty of places for tourists to try fresh seafood and fruits picked right from local trees, such as mangoes and star apples.

Significant changes

Hon Thom Island has changed considerably in recent years. Many tourists insist that they see significant changes every time they return. Even people living on Hon Thom, if asked, say, “Hon Thom is now very different.”

One of the most significant changes was the installation of a power grid in 2015. With that came the introduction of tourist activities such as jet-skiing and tours to visit other nearby islands. Before electricity was installed, Hon Thom was only designated for one-day trips in which tourists would come during the day to enjoy the beaches, food, and scenery before returning to hotels on other islands by canoe at sunset.

Another factor contributing to the island’s popularity is the new cable car system connecting An Thoi Town with the three main islands in the An Thoi archipelago, including Hon Thom Islet. More significantly, the ropeway is the world’s longest cable car system above the sea.

Visitors cannot resist the opportunity to see the set of islands from the sky. As the cable cars lift visitors from the ground, clear blue water, highlands covered with greenery and sandy beaches slowly begin to shrink. From above, tourists can view the beautiful beaches of Hon Thom including Nom, Chuong, and Chao beaches, as well as other islands and islets such as Hon Roi Islet, Hon Dua Islet, and Hon Mong Tay Islet, all of which are quite well-known to tourists thanks to the many tours offered to these places. One of the tourists even commented: “No artist is talented enough to paint such a beautiful picture.”

Read more: Fusion Phu Quoc Resort

Liveinmuine.com providing a reliable and affordable hotel transfer service. We operating all over Vietnam. You’ll get a direct door-to-door transfer directly to your destination. Whether it’s an airport, port, train station, town or city we have the right vehicle for you. So, tell us where and when you’d like to go, whatever time day or night our vehicles could be available to suit all your needs. Moreover, check also sightseeing tours, personal driver service, and Muine quality accommodation options. Thank you!

Vietnam’s islands

Vietnam is very densely populated. With most of its 90 million people living along a narrow coastal strip, it’s all too easy to experience the country through a blur of exhaust fumes, struggling along Highway 1 and stopping off at the most popular towns and cities along the way. As it’s a lot to take in, you would do well to factor in time away from the mainland, on one of the country’s beautiful islands that are fast attracting visitors.

In the north, the Ha Long Bay area has more than 2,000 craggy limestone islets, but you need to choose your boat trip carefully as the Unesco-listed region is wildly popular. So it’s worth investing a little time to explore the less-visited, outer islands. Off the central coast, the Cham Islands are a great day trip from historic Hoi An, while in the deep south, Phu Quoc is developing fast but has a lush interior and unspoiled beaches. For the ultimate escape, however, my pick would be remote Con Dao, with a fascinating history and empty beaches.  

CON DAO

The Con Dao islands have an utterly unhurried ambience. “There are two traffic lights, but no work,” the bike rental guy said apologetically as he gave me the island rundown. “One gas station, but close for lunch. Only one road, so you no lost. Right to airport or left to prisons and port.” Moped key in hand, I was relishing the chance to get out and explore some empty roads in search of a perfect beach for the day. I’d spent the previous week embracing Vietnamese city culture and its furious energy and commerce but was now in need of some serious hammock time.

A cluster of 16 islets in the South China Sea, the Con Dao islands are 155 miles from Ho Chi Minh City. Only the main island, Con Son, is inhabited (its population is just 6,000), though the other islands can be visited.

Once hell on earth to thousands of prisoners incarcerated by French colonists and the American military, today the Con Daos are blissfully tranquil. With their ravishing sandy bays, rainforests and healthy coral reefs, their tropical appeal is easy to grasp. Flight connections used to be atrocious, but Vietnam Airlines now offers three daily flights from Ho Chi Minh City.

The rental guy had lied about the one road. Easily sidetracked, my Honda and I had chanced upon a rough track close to the airport, and our inquisitiveness had rewarded us royally in the form of Dam Trau beach, a sublime half-moon crescent of pale sand, bookended by forest-topped rocky promontories.

After an hour’s snorkeling, exploring the kaleidoscopic coral teeming with macro life and spending five minutes swimming eye-to-eye with a hawksbill turtle, I retreated to the plastic chairs in the bay’s seafood shack, picked a victim from the live fish tank and gorged on crab with tamarind and chilli. The only other diners were a group from Hanoi, employees of a state-owned bank on a corporate jolly-with-a-purpose.

Vietnam is a country steeped in revolutionary rhetoric, and Vo Thi Sau, a teenage resistance fighter executed in Con Dao during the French occupation, fits the bill perfectly. (She killed a captain in a grenade attack at the age of 14, and wasn’t captured until years later.) The bank staff was here to pay their respects to this national heroine, and to the thousands of others who lost their lives in Con Dao’s 11 prisons.

Ghosts are everywhere in Con Dao, nowhere more so than at Phu Hai jail. Built in 1862, it once housed 20,000 prisoners – political and criminal inmates chained together naked in rows. The really troublesome individuals were kept in “tiger cages”, with six to 10 men crammed into a tiny open-roofed enclosure, beaten with sticks from above and dusted with lime and water (which burns the skin). Unbeknown to the world, the Americans continued operating these tiger cages until 1970 when a Life magazine report broke news of their existence, provoking an international outcry.

It had been a chastening day, the brutality of prison conditions contrasting acutely with the overwhelming beauty of my surroundings. As I strolled along the seafront promenade in Con Son town, it was easy to marvel at the sheer gentility of this pocket-sized island capital, its litter-free streets, French-era villas, well-kept municipal buildings and air of calm and prosperity.

Con Son town has a dozen or so hotels and guesthouses but the Six Senses resort (sixsenses.com, a short ride away to the north, really is in a class of its own. Occupying the island’s best beach, it comprises 50 or so ocean-front, timber-clad beach villas, each fusing contemporary style with rustic chic.

The next day I dropped by the National Park offices just outside Con Son town. The islands’ ecosystems are unique, with 11 trees found nowhere else in the world. It’s thought that a dozen or so dugong, or “sea cows”, remain in the waters around Con Dao, though they are extremely elusive.

You’ve a much better chance of seeing sea turtles as the islands are Vietnam’s most important nesting ground. The World Wide Fund for Nature has supported conservation efforts to protect the green turtle, and national park rangers run night-time boat trips to neighboring Bay Canh island (the main turtle-nesting season is May to November).

I’d already been lucky enough to snorkel with a turtle, so I fixed up a hike with a ranger instead. Following a slippery but well-marked trail we entered the ever-dripping island rainforest, inching up a mountainside past giant creepers, roots and shoots, picking our way over colossal hardwood buttresses up to the long-abandoned So Ray Plantation, established by the French but now occupied by a sociable troop of long-tailed macaques which are thriving amid the fruit trees planted decades earlier.

On my last day I hooked up with a Honda again for a ride south. Bicycles are also available for rent from hotels (from £2 per day) and taxis can be booked, though they are quite pricey. We hugged the coastline, buzzing past coves and beaches, the lonely road lined with wild bougainvillea and the curious aerial-rooted pandan tree. Towering granite cliffs cascaded down to a turquoise sea as we rounded Ca Map point before rolling into Ben Dam, a no-nonsense port preoccupied with the gritty business of Vietnamese life.

Here sailors sell giant durian fruit from boats and their decks are crisscrossed with clotheslines pegged with drying seaweed, fluttering in the ocean breeze. I ordered a treacle-thick Vietnamese coffee from a café to fix me up for the return leg and paused to watch ruddy-cheeked, beer-happy men paddle from the shore in bizarre coracle-like contraptions back to their fishing boats moored in the bay.

My final stop was Hang Duong cemetery. In the windy season, bones lie exposed in the sun here when the sandy topsoil is blown away. But today there was just the gentlest of breezes, on which drifted the smell of incense.

Following the scent through the flowering scrubs and trees, I was guided to a specific grave, one of thousands there. Here I found the group of bank workers again, heads bowed, at the tomb of Vo Thi Sau as prayers were offered and thanks are given to a national icon.

I found myself contemplating the nature of the modern Vietnamese nation: the long struggle for independence and years of suffering, today’s breakneck pace of development, the economic successes and the inevitable growing pains. Here in Con Dao, I enjoyed the silence.

CAT BA

Rugged, mountainous Cat Ba island is emerging as a great base to explore the wider Ha Long region. Most of the island is a national park, with trails that fringe the habitat of one of the world’s rarest primates, the cherubic-looking, but highly endangered Cat Ba langur.

Cat Ba is also something of an adventure sports mecca thanks to pioneering work by Asia Outdoors (asiaoutdoors.com.vn), which has established dozens of climbing routes on the spectacular limestone islets that fringe Cat Ba, and also offers all sorts of kayaking and sailing excursions.

In Vietnam you’re never far from a reminder of the conflict locals call the American War. Cat Ba’s amazing Hospital Cave was used by the North Vietnamese as a safe shelter for the military elite, and has its own operating theatres, a small swimming pool and even a cinema.

CHAM ISLANDS

Until a few years ago the Cham islands in central Vietnam were a military zone and off-limits to tourism. Times have changed and the islands are now accessible by boat trips (April to September only) from Hoi An.

During the main Vietnamese holiday season (July and August) local tour groups can swamp the golden beaches, but after they’ve departed (around 2pm) normal service (peace) resumes.

There’s decent diving, though visibility can be challenging. Try Cham Islands Diving (vietnamscubadiving.com) and Blue Coral (divehoian.com).

Make sure to drop by the unusual little temple Ong Ngu in Bai Lang, which is dedicated to the whale and whale shark (regarded as oceanic gods by locals until a generation or two ago).

PHU QUOC

In Vietnam’s extreme south, Phu Quoc island is tipped to be the country’s next beach hot spot. A new international airport opened in 2012 (daily flights arrive from Ho Chi Minh City) and dirt roads are steadily being paved.

For now it’s still possible to find a quiet place to escape the mainland crowds. Try eco-friendly Mango Bay (mangobayphuquoc.com or Itaca (itacalounge.com), which offers modern-Mediterranean and Asian food, hip decor, DJs and a chilled atmosphere.

Break up the beach-hopping, if you can brave the smell, with a visit to the nuoc mam (fish sauce) factory in Duong Dong, the main town.

When to go

Vietnam has a very complicated climate. The best time to visit the Con Dao islands is between November and March.

Getting there

Vietnam Airlines (vietnamairlines.com) has direct flights from Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City to Phu Quoc.

SOURCE: https://www.telegraph.co.uk

Liveinmuine.com providing a reliable and affordable hotel transfer service. We operating all over Vietnam. You’ll get a direct door-to-door transfer directly to your destination. Whether it’s an airport, port, train station, town or city we have the right vehicle for you. So, tell us where and when you’d like to go, whatever time day or night our vehicles could be available to suit all your needs. Moreover, check also sightseeing tours, personal driver service, and Muine quality accommodation options. Thank you!

Phu Quy Island

Lying in central Viet Nam, about 103km from Phan Thiet city, Phu Quy district is an ideal tourist destination for holiday-makers as it houses 10 small islands, with Phu Quy Island being the biggest in pristine condition. Every day there is a ship leaving the port in Phan Thiet city to bring locals and visitors from the mainland to Phu Quy, with fares costing between VND150,000-200,000 each. There is also a high speed boat to the island, and the service cuts the travel time by half, just two hours, with fares costing around VND330,000.

Phu Quy is famous for its natural beauty and tasty foods. Despite the long voyage, the tour of Phu Quy and nearby islands still attracts many visitors as a Vietnamese saying goes “High mountains can’t barrier lovers”. The island district has a total area of 32sq.km. It has an abundant source of seafood, making its Binh Thuan province the second largest fishing area in Viet Nam. Phu Quy is like a generous host that would try to compensate for visitors after a long journey. Its foods are fresh, tasty, cheap and weird. They include “Moon crabs” that have red spots on the back, and “King crabs” that have a better quality than in other areas.

The district also offers steamed or grilled lobsters that can make a visitor’s tongue really “numb”. There is a buffet from snails that are soft, sweet, and fat. A fish buffet is another feast that eaters can’t forget, with enough boiled, grilled, fried, steamed fish, cooked porridge, fish soup, and fish rolls which are always extremely tasty. Visitors would be surprised by the wealth of the islands. All the roads are wide and asphalted.

Basaltic soil makes fruit trees luxuriant, including the mango and guava that have sweet tastes thanks to the climate and soil characteristics. “Anything in Phu Quy is fresh and surprisingly cheap, from seafood to fruits and meals,” says Nguyen Lam Anh, a visitor from HCM City, adding that it is a real joy to rent a motorbike to tour around the island. “We should also get up early to catch the sunrise and wait for the fishing boats to come back.

You may feel blackouts with all sorts of sea produce,” he confides. Some visitors have fun going on a boat to floating houses to learn how to feed fish and crabs and have lunch there. Another destination in the district is Linh Quang pagoda, built in 1747 with the sacred ancient Buddhist statues. Van An Thanh Temple was built in 1781 to worship Nam Hai (East Sea) Spirit and exhibit a 20m-long whale skeleton. The Cao Cat Mountain at the altitude of nearly 100m, with Linh Son Pagoda, erected on its top, and the giant boulders cliff is an ideal spot to contemplate the panorama of the islands.

The beaches on the island are very beautiful and clean as they are far from residential areas. Despite no big hotels, there are decent rest houses, and local people are friendly, Lam Anh remarks. Tran Ngoc Can, an official from the island district, says Phu Quy is wild and attractive, but local tourism is yet to develop because of poor traffic conditions. “According to our tourism development plan from now till 2015, with a vision for 2020, the island district will boost tourism as a key economic sector. To do this, we are calling for investment to upgrade infrastructure and build more transport ships,” he says. But many visitors are happy to explore wild nature on the island. “We visit the islands to wash lungs and eyes, and more importantly to get rid of trouble from city life,” says Lam.

Read more: Phan Thiet Phu Quy high speet boat
Phu Quy untouched beauty

Liveinmuine.com providing a reliable and affordable hotel transfer service. We operating all over Vietnam. You’ll get a direct door-to-door transfer directly to your destination. Whether it’s an airport, port, train station, town or city we have the right vehicle for you. So, tell us where and when you’d like to go, whatever time day or night our vehicles could be available to suit all your needs. Moreover, check also sightseeing tours, personal driver service, and Muine quality accommodation options. Thank you!