Hoi An City of lanterns

Hoi An - City of Lanterns. Laterns festival

HOI AN CITY OF LANTERNS. Hoi An is a city in Viet Nam about 30km to the south of Danang. The Old Town of Hoi An is listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It was a typical trading port in Southeast Asia from the 15th to the 19th century. Indeed, thanks to its favorable location, Chinese and Japanese settlement, Hoi An became a busy trading port. Moreover, the handicraft villages such as lanterns, carpentry, pottery, vegetables… also created the busy trading port of Hoi An.

In particular, Hoi An is considered as the cradle of pure Vietnamese lanterns. Anyone who has ever been to Hoi An cannot forget its nostalgic beauty. Walking through the old quarter, you will immerse yourself in typical buildings of the Old Town of Hoi An of the 18th and 19th centuries with wooden houses, mossy walls and street vendors. Throughout the streets, you can see beautiful lanterns in different shapes in every restaurant, shops, hotels… Definitely, Hoi An cannot be completely beautiful without lanterns. The harmony of lanterns’ colors, the authenticity and the tranquility of the city make us fall in love with Hoi An.

Furthermore, contemplating lanterns in Hoi An is really interesting. Indeed, at every moment, they all have their own beauty. We can see all delicacy, creativity and talent of artisans by looking at these lanterns in the morning with all their details. When night comes, lanterns are bright and full of magic colors. It is lanterns that bring to Hoi An the poetic nocturnal beauty.

Actually, lanterns appeared in the late 16th century when the first Chinese came to settle. They hung the lamp to deal with the feeling of nostalgia. According to the local population, the craftsman Huynh Van Ba was the first one who studied, created and integrated the cultural characteristics of Vietnam into traditional lanterns. The process of making a lantern is a meticulous work that requires many skills of artisans. The main materials used are bamboo and silk which are familiar images in Vietnamese people’s life.

At first, the upper class in society was the only one who could have big lanterns decorated with Chinese characters or paintings hanging at home. Gradually, lanterns became popular for the middle class in the form of home decor by retaining its beauty, luxury and inherent charm.

Nowadays, lanterns come in various shapes, sizes as well as methods of construction. They can be spherical lanterns, pumpkin-shaped lanterns or rotating lanterns. Each shape and color of the lantern has a different meaning. For example, the rounds symbolize harmony and balance. This is a typical shape of lantern in Hoi An. According to folklore, a lantern hanging in the house is the symbol bringing more warmth, peace and luck to the home. If you have the chance to visit Viet Nam, you should not miss Hoi An and the contemplation of lanterns. Source: vietnamtourism.com

Read more:
Danang City
Danang International airport
Golden Bridge Ba Na Hills

Source: vietnamtourism.com

Vietnam best beaches

Find a best beach for your holiday in Muine

Planning a beach vacation? There was a time when tourists thinking about a holiday near a pristine beach and a crystal clear blue sea though ‘’Caribbean’’, ‘’South Pacific’’, perhaps islands in the Indian Ocean? They remain great destinations but in recent years, Vietnam has come to rival these places in many ways, and with the country having much more to offer than just a tranquil setting, a Vietnam beach holiday is worth serious consideration.

Vietnam has an extensive coastline, great lagoons, caves to explore and many idyllic offshore islands. It has resulted in a number of places developing good tourist infrastructure, and others still offering solitude for those that want it. A Vietnam beach break is also a great way to finish a holiday in the country, experiencing its history and culture as well as the natural environment on offer in places like Sapa in the Northern Highlands, and the Central Highlands around Dalat. It is something that the traditional beach destinations are unable to rival.

There is little doubt that Vietnam’s beaches are going to get busier. They have been promoted in films in recent years while word of mouth, with more and more tourists visiting the country each year, has certainly helped to increase the demand for a Vietnam beach holiday. Here are some of the best beaches in Vietnam to consider.

Typically, rainfall only comes in the form of showers so, to that extent, it possibly holds an advantage over the north when you think about a Vietnam beach holiday. The proximity of Ho Chi Minh City has meant that resorts in the South have developed more quickly.

  • Vung Tau is now quite crowded now with weekend breaks from the city a popular activity of locals.
  • Con Dao islands have an utterly unhurried ambiance. There are two traffic lights, but no work, a gas station, but close for lunch and only one road, so you no lost. Right to the airport or left to prisons and port. A cluster of 16 islets in the South China Sea, the Con Dao islands are 155 miles from Ho Chi Minh City. Only the main island, Con Son, is inhabited (its population is just 6,000), though the other islands can be visited.
  • Phu Quoc is an island off the coast of Cambodia in the Gulf of Thailand. Phu Quoc known for white-sand beaches and resorts.
  • My Khe Beach in Danang is clean and looking fantastic, very long and not so crowded, good for swimming and sunbathing. There are many options to stay ranging from budget hotels to luxurious ones. My Khe beach was popular for a break from hostilities for US Marines during the Vietnam War. It is now an ideal destination for the beach holiday in Vietnam.
  • Nha Trang has been nicknamed the ‘’Vietnamese Riviera’’ and one of the beaches close by is Doc Let Beach. Nha Trang is well known for its beaches and scuba diving. There are several resorts — such as Vinpearl, Diamond Bay and Ana Mandara — and amusement and water parks, in the city and on islands off the coast.
  • Lang Co beach near Hoi An has been listed among the best beaches in the world. Actually, Lang Co Bay is a famous area with imposing scenery, mountains and forests, clear blue sea and soft, white sand adjoins each other that many travelers to Vietnam in the past have missed the chance to view this hidden beauty.
  • Phan Thiet was formerly just a small fishing village and it is especially famous for its fish sauce (nuoc mam). Mui Ne beach is 20 kilometers from Phan Thiet and there are water sports for those not simply wanting to lie on the beach.

The climate in the north limits the safe time for a Vietnam beach holiday to the height of summer, July and August. However, Halong Bay is such a stunning place that it attracts tourists all year round. If the sun shines, you can lie on a beach if you like though there is so much else to see and do. Vietnam is attracting people from all over the world and the numbers are increasing all the time. The beaches were never the main reason why they used to come but such is their quality, they have now become another string to Vietnam’s bow. Bai Chay beach is probably the best beach option for those heading east from Ha Noi. The town of Bai Chay, along with Hong Gai, together are officially referred to as Ha Long City. Beach is huge and best for those who like to relax & enjoy the views.

Liveinmuine.com providing a reliable and affordable hotel transfer service. We operating all over Vietnam. You’ll get a direct door-to-door transfer directly to your destination. Whether it’s an airport, port, train station, town or city we have the right vehicle for you. So, tell us where and when you’d like to go, whatever time day or night our vehicles could be available to suit all your needs. Moreover, check also sightseeing tours, personal driver service, and Muine quality accommodation options. Thank you!

Hai Tac Pirates Archipelago

In December 2017, the Kiên Giang People’s Committee recognised the archipelago as a local tourism site.

Tien Hai is the only island commune in Ha Tien District, the southern province of Kien Giang. The commune also has another name: Hai Tac (Pirates) Archipelago. It boasts 16 islands and the total area of 283ha. In the past few years, the island commune has developed community tourism models, making contributions to socio-economic development for Ha Tien District. In December 2017, the Kien Giang People’s Committee recognized the archipelago as a local tourism site.   

Tourists coming to Ha Tien District are always curious about the Hai Tac archipelago, a famed place in the southwest sea of the country. According to local historic documents from the 17th century, Mạc Thiên Tích, a leader of the region, many times ordered his troops to fight against local pirates, who lived in the area. The archipelago name Hai Tac originated from that time.

Besides its mysterious name, Tien Hai island commune has great potential for developing tourism thanks to its primitive landscapes, fresh and cool atmosphere. In order to utilize the tourism potential, in 2014 the local authorities implemented a community tourism project for the period 2014-2020. The commune consists of 16 large and small islands, locating 20km from Ha Tien Town and 40km from Phu Quoc Island.

The commune hosts 500 families with 2,000 people, who live mainly in Hon Tre Lon, Hon Giang, Hon Duoc and Hon Ụ. The biggest among the islands is Hon Tre Lon (also known as Hon Đoc), which is an administration and socio-economic center for the Tien Hai island commune. All people and agencies in the commune are informed about the project and encouraged to join involuntarily.

Hon Tre Village was chosen as a trial model with 17 families, who meet the requirements, to join the community tourism project. Eleven households among them offer food and accommodation services, four households have acted as guides to take visitors to islands and fishing, and two households keep sea fish for visitors to understand raising local fish. Two companies have been specialized in transporting tourists to and from the mainland.  Over the last three years, the project has brought along active results.

The number of guests coming every year has significantly increased and is now up to 70,000 tourists per year. A visitor from Rach Gia City northern province of Kien Giang said she spent two vacations in the area. What I like most when stay at the home of locals in Tien Hai is that I can live near them, see their routines and imagine as if I were a local, she said. However, the area is still lack of freshwater and electricity. By 2020, the national electricity system will reach the islands and tourism service will be better. “Its name “Hai Tac” (Pirates) is scary but actually the islands are beautiful in peace and many romantic beaches with white sand and blue water run long,” Phượng said.

Hai Viet, an old resident on Hon Tre Vinh Island recalled his grandfather’s story on the pirates. “There was once a pirate group named Canh Buom Den (Black Sail) on this island,” he said, “They mostly robbed trading ships passing Ha Tien – Rach Gia Bay. “On the pirates’ ship hung a mop, meaning sweeping off all ships passing by. “The gang controlled a big sea area of the Gulf of Thailand. Up to now, there are still rumors of treasure hidden by the pirates somewhere on this archipelago,” he said. Many locals still believe there is treasure hidden on Hon Doc and scattering around the archipelago.

The only ancient mark on the island is a pagoda named Son Hoa Tu. It is said that once there was ahead of a pirate gang named Nguyễn Thanh Vân. Rumors say he was strong, was a brilliant swimmer and could dive as well as an otter, rebellious but at the same time, had a kind heart. Once his gang traveled to Thailand, he fell in love with a beautiful woman and took her to Vietnam. Since then, he quit the pirate life. They had a daughter called Nguyễn Thị Gái, who was then respected by locals as she built the only pagoda on the islands. The Son Hoa Tu Pagoda remains up to now as an evidence of rumors on local pirates, a special attraction for tourists to the pristine islands. — VNS”

Read more: Intercontinental Phu Quoc Resort

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Phu Quoc Vietnam’s Maldives

Take a summer trip to Vietnam's 'Maldives' Phu Quoc Island boasts sandy beaches, turquoise waters, historic relics, fresh seafood and more.

Phu Quoc Island boasts sandy beaches, turquoise waters, historic relics, fresh seafood and more. Lying on the southern coast off the Mekong Delta province of Kien Giang, Phu Quoc has become one of the top holiday destinations in Vietnam. Vietnam’s largest island has recently been named one of the most beautiful places in the country by U.S. news site CNN. However, the beach paradise has kept its best secrets awaiting to be discovered. With the summer vacation season calling, allow us to plan you a four-day trip to catch the best of the amazing island, dubbed ‘Vietnam’s Maldives’.

For a castaway-esque experience, head east to one of the oldest fishing villages on the glamorous island that lies just 20 kilometers to the south of Duong Dong Town, the capital of Phu Quoc. It is no exaggeration to call Ham Ninh a priceless jewel with pristine charm and beauty that has luckily escaped the tourism boom raging on Vietnam’s largest island. Locals still live in the same thatched houses and catch shrimp, fish, pearls and sea cucumbers to earn a living. Travel tip: Sunrise is the best time to stroll around Ham Ninh, and don’t forget to bring your camera with you to capture the best of the fishing village.

On the second day, wake up early to make your way to Sao Beach, one of the top beaches on Phu Quoc and dubbed as “crown jewel” of the pearl island by the U.K.’s Telegraph. From the downtown, hop in a taxi for around VND300,000 ($13) to get to the beach that boasts crystal blue water and stretches of soft white sand. A bit of advice: buy a package tour for VND550,000 ($24) per person for hands-on experience. The tour includes a 30-minute motorboat ride, snorkeling on the coral reef and squid-fishing at night.

Once branded “Hell on Earth” for its notorious jail, Phu Quoc Prison is living witness to the most horrifying scenes of oppression during wartime that has left mysterious and creepy stories behind. A tour here will render every heart heavy but will make your trip a lot more memorable. And don’t miss a chance to drop by Dinh Cau (Cau Temple), which is just 25 kilometers from the prison. Get lost and allow your breath to be taken away as the sun goes down over the shimmering water. Prepare to take your wallet with you for a night trip to the Phu Quoc night market, which has around 50 food stalls serving a wide range of Vietnamese seafood. It is a great place for anyone who wants to go out for a late bite.

Leaving the noisy downtown behind, pack up and head north around 20 kilometers to Ganh Dau Cape, one of the few inhabited and secluded gems on Phu Quoc. It would be a waste of a trip not to set foot on Ganh Dau and enjoy the fresh air and peaceful atmosphere. Tourism is not yet a popular term here, so services are still underdeveloped. Don’t expect a fancy world of restaurants and bars, but instead try little homestay facilities willing to treat you to exotic seafood dishes. After that, take a trek through the primitive forests in Phu Quoc National Park which is home to a rich variety of fauna and flora. If you have enough time, try to conquer Chua Mountain at a height of 565 meters above sea level, considered the roof of Phu Quoc.

It’s not difficult to find all the local specialties in markets on Phu Quoc. Among them are honey, pearls, fish sauce, pepper and Rose Myrtle wine.

If you’re a fan of straight-from-the-sea food, the best time to touch down in Phu Quoc Island is between May and November which is the fishing season. But if you wish to get a true taste of Phu Quoc’s culinary world, do not miss a noodle soup called “bun quay,” or stirred noodles, at the intersection of Tran Phu and Cach Mang Thang Tam, raw herring salad served with Phu Quoc’s fish sauce on Tran Hung Dao Street, and thick noodles with mackerel on Bach Dang Street. Plus, several famous restaurants in Phu Quoc that you should note down are Com Bac 123 on April 30 Street, Hello on Tran Hung Dao Street, and Quoc Anh on Bach Dang Street.

From Hanoi and Saigon, the best way to reach Phu Quoc, which was named among the top 10 destinations in Southeast Asia by the U.K. travel magazine Rough Guides, is flying. Vietnam Airlines and Vietjet Air have direct flights to Phu Quoc every day. Return tickets usually cost VND1 million ($44) from HCMC and VND2 million from Hanoi.

Phu Quoc International Airport stands around five kilometers (three miles) from the downtown. You can take a shuttle bus from the airport or call a cab to get into the town center. Those who start their trips from HCMC can also opt for a sleeper coach to Rach Gia or Ha Tien, and then take a high-speed boat. It takes six to eight hours by coach and costs from VND150,000 to VND190,000. High-speed boat tours are available at 8 a.m. and 8.45 a.m. every day with tickets priced at VND340,000 per person. A bit of advice: book your tickets in advance during the peak travel season to avoid higher costs. Once in town, you can hire motorbikes for VND120,000-150,000 per day or book a car for around VND750,000 per day if you’re traveling in a group of five to seven. You can ask your hotel or homestay to help you with this.

For accommodations, a number of four-star hotels and resorts scattered around Duong Dong Town, the capital of Phu Quoc, cost from VND1.5 million per night for two people. For cheaper options, take a look at the hotels on Nguyen Dinh Chieu, April 30 and Nguyen An Ninh streets, with prices ranging from VND300,000 to VND500,000 per night. Homestay services are also worth consideration. You can choose from D’Hotel, 9 Station Hotel and 88 Hilltop Hostel & Villa on Tran Hung Dao Street, and Cottage Village and Peace House along Tran Hung Dao Street. Prices range from VND150,000 to VND300,000 per night.

The best time to make a trip to Phu Quoc is between October and May, with the rain long gone and the sun shining down on crystal blue waters.  Avoid the crowds and beware of the heat and scorching sun. Phu Quoc is also home to other places of interest, including Nguyen Trung Truc Temple, Ho Quoc Pagoda, Khem Beach, Long Beach and the Rach Vem fishing village.

Read more: JW Marriott Phu Quoc Emerald Bay Resort & Spa
Radisson Blu Resort Phu Quoc

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Good morning Vietnam

Phu Quoc island in the southern province of Kien Giang has been named as one of the top 10 most beautiful Asian islands to visit this summer

VIETNAM passes the test of the three Cs: it’s cheap, cheerful and close – and, in these difficult times, it is safe. Vietnam will become an increasingly important destination for international tourists and has the potential to become the most popular Asian destination. It not only offers superb beaches and bargain shopping, but the Vietnamese cuisine also is a delight and the chance of picking up food bugs is minimal.  

Visitors either enter in the south at Ho Chi Minh City (it was Saigon) and slowly make their way north to the capital Hanoi or vice versa. They can use Ho Chi Minh City as a base to explore the Mekong Delta, which is the rice bowl of the country and worth an overnight trip. The meander north can include Nha Trang, a one-hour flight north from HCMC and a very relaxing beach stopover. It is similar to Bali, with hawkers on the beach to make life more bearable, selling fresh fruit, beer, T-shirts, postcards, jewelry… you name it and they sell it. Unlike Bali, however, the hawkers are usually happy to take “no” for an answer.

The next 60-minute flight took us from Nha Trang to the coastal town of Da Nang where China Beach became a famous R&R spot for troops during the Vietnam War. A 30-minute hair-raising drive from Da Nang was Hoi An, the town of tailors – almost 800 of them to be precise. They can knock up any sort of clothing in two days – suits, jackets, slacks, skirts, and shirts – and that includes at least one fitting. Prices range from about $10 for shirts up to $120 for suits and it is very competitive.

A complete wardrobe revamp could take a few days but the money saved could pay for the trip, so don’t miss Hoi An. For visitors more interested in the beach, a beautiful strip of white sand is just 5km from the town where there are several high-class resorts. A two-hour bus trip from Hoi An leads north to Hue, the ancient capital of Vietnam. A must-see for visitors is the old city and citadel which is being rebuilt after extensive damage during the war.

Fighting around Hue was intense and the town was retaken by the Vietcong during the Tet Offensive – a nationwide uprising in 1968, which claimed 1000 American and 2000 South Vietnamese army deaths while the North Vietnamese lost 32,000 troops. It was the beginning of the end of the war but it was not until 1975 that the Americans pulled out. Another 90-minute flight took us from Hue to Hanoi and back to the big-city bustle where the motorcycle is king.

Hanoi has three million people and two million motorcycles and very little in the way of road rules. It is organized chaos, as horns constantly toot and bikes dive into holes in the traffic. Little wonder that about 30 people die every day on Vietnam roads. There’s no break in the traffic, so crossing the street is an art that has to be learned quickly. It’s a case of slowly moving across the street, no sudden movements while making eye contact with oncoming drivers. The traffic flows around pedestrians. The trick is to do this while praying and avoiding the almost overwhelming temptation to panic and run.

A welcome break from Hanoi was a trip to Halong Bay – three hours by bus but a world away cruising the bay that is littered with unusual limestone rock formations. Old junks have been rebuilt to cater for six couples in cabins with their own en suites. Very civilized, and all for around $50 a head for the two days with meals thrown in. Another Hanoi sanity stopover is Sapa, an overnight train trip away in the highlands near the Chinese border.

While Hanoi and, to a lesser extent Ho Chi Minh City, are interesting, they are also heavily polluted, so it is best to spend most of a Vietnam visit in the provinces. After hundreds of years of war with the Chinese, the French, and then the Americans, the good times have finally come to these resilient and resourceful people. Vietnam is no longer at war. It’s a country going places with plenty to offer.”

Source: http://www.news.com.au

Liveinmuine.com providing a reliable and affordable hotel transfer service. We operating all over Vietnam. You’ll get a direct door-to-door transfer directly to your destination. Whether it’s an airport, port, train station, town or city we have the right vehicle for you. So, tell us where and when you’d like to go, whatever time day or night our vehicles could be available to suit all your needs. Moreover, check also sightseeing tours, personal driver service, and Muine quality accommodation options. Thank you!

HCMC coffe culture

The first thing a stranger needs to learn in Ho Chi Minh City is how to cross the road. It’s a daunting challenge that requires a fine balance of nonchalance and acute awareness, of deliberate forward motion and hesitancy. Facing down a phalanx of buzzing mopeds with riders expressionless behind helmets and masks is dizzying. It takes a while to discover that it’s a dance of giving and take; that the moped riders will flow around you; that, in the end, the last thing to do is stop. Maybe that’s the essence of Ho Chi Minh City itself.   

It’s a metropolis where it feels as though the future has burst its banks. Skyscrapers rise out of the ground, obliterating neighborhoods where family life once played out at street level. And yet, at the foot of one of these glass-and-steel monoliths sits an old lady, skin like fragile rice paper, serving steaming pho (noodle soup) from an old cart, as if nothing at all has changed.

The best way to enjoy this peculiar balancing act is to sit on the balcony of one of the innumerable coffee houses scattered throughout the city. This way you will be out of the fray but able to look down on the street hustle below. You will also be drinking the beverage that must be at least partly responsible for the kinetic energy that has transformed this city into one of the most sophisticated commercial hubs of south-east Asia in just 20 years.

On the terrace of L’Usine, a French-inspired café overlooking the opera house, I ordered the classic Vietnamese coffee known as ca phe sua da – literally “coffee, milk, ice”. It comprises strong coffee, dripped from a small metal filter into a cup containing a quarter as much sweetened condensed milk, then stirred and poured over ice in a glass.

At first, I couldn’t bear its cloying sweetness, but three days in I’d grown addicted to the sweet buzz that follows a refreshing coolness on the tongue. It suits the humidity of the place in a way that an ordinary latte wouldn’t. Coffee was introduced to Vietnam by the French in the late 19th century but the country quickly became a strong exporter, as vast swathes of the highlands were given over to this important new cash crop. And now the Vietnamese have taken coffee to new levels of almost gastronomical – even medicinal – heights.

At Trung Nguyen Coffee – the Vietnamese equivalent of Starbucks, with a chain of cafés across the city – the coffee menu stretched to five pages. The vibe was studiously chic, with low-slung sofas and Seventies retro branding in orange and brown. Fellow patrons were largely beatnik-inspired youths and businessmen.

Coffee is taken seriously here, with beans from Italy, Japan, Turkey, and Ethiopia, but it was the varieties of Vietnamese coffee that deserved more exploration. They came with different bean combinations and recipes, and lofty names such as “Success”, “Creation”, “Discover” and “Thought”. I went for the “Passiona”, which was exclusively promoted for women with the promise that to drink this nectar would be to maintain perfect skin and a life of “passion and success”.

I drank it a lot, not necessarily because of its promises but because it was delicious. A kind of coffee smoothie, it was developed over the course of nine years and included a concoction of collagen, vitamin PP (to combat skin dryness) and rare oriental herbs. It was probably a calorie overload but became for me a daily ritual while I contemplated the city’s exquisitely balanced fusion of old and new.

At Mr Huynh’s street restaurant with no name, eating his signature beef pho under neon lights, I realised that no matter how many skyscrapers rise and how many mopeds speed towards the future, Vietnam’s past lives on in its food – in the steaming pho on street corners, in the markets with fish thrashing about in gleaming steel bowls, in the mounds of rice of a dozen varieties and the heaps of freshly harvested herbs. As Mr Huynh explained, few Vietnamese people own refrigerators because they buy everything fresh from the market.

Whether rich or poor, they prefer to eat on the street on tiny stools, and every restaurant uses family recipes passed down through generations. So it is that the hunky-dory youths with mobile phones pinned to their ears park their mopeds on the pavement, pull up a stool and eat the same food as their great-great-grandmothers did, long before the Vietnam War interrupted the gathering of rice in the paddies of the Mekong.

I bought my last cup of ca phe sua da from a street vendor outside the War Remnants Museum and drank it in the shadow of an old American tank with Lou, a young Vietnamese woman who still struggled with the war. Her name, Lou, had been given to her by a much-loved aunt who was separated from her family as a girl and ended up being taken care of by a French army deserter hiding from US troops in the mountains.

She went with him to France and it took her 30 years to find her way back to her family; to achieve that, she had to leave her beloved dog behind. The visit to the museum brought up sore memories for Lou, who’d had to change her foreign-sounding name in school to protect her from hatred as she might have been thought of as mixed-race.

“Everyone here has a story,” she told me. “Everyone lost someone, and many had to live with the shame of fighting on the wrong side. We fought and killed one another. No one talks about the war any more, as if it is over, but it isn’t really. It lives on in the silence.”

So in the cacophony that is street life in Ho Chi Minh City, each person carries the past as a secret wound, offering it quietly at his or her ancestral altars but forgetting it during the daily rush and the forgiving clatter of commerce. Vietnam has been invaded by the Chinese, the Japanese, the French and, finally, the Americans. That last legacy fills the rooms of the museum, where a visit concludes with eloquent photographs and testimony from the many, many people bearing the scars and disfigurements of chemical warfare.

Lou didn’t talk about it. Neither did I. We both sipped through our straws, drawing on the sweetness of our ca phe sua da as if it might dilute the bitterness of memory and loss.”

Source: https://www.telegraph.co.uk

Liveinmuine.com providing a reliable and affordable hotel transfer service. We operating all over Vietnam. You’ll get a direct door-to-door transfer directly to your destination. Whether it’s an airport, port, train station, town or city we have the right vehicle for you. So, tell us where and when you’d like to go, whatever time day or night our vehicles could be available to suit all your needs. Moreover, check also sightseeing tours, personal driver service, and Muine quality accommodation options. Thank you!

World longest cable car

Phu Quoc to have world's longest cable car

The world longest cable car will be in Phu Quoc. A sea cable car route connecting An Thoi town and Hon Thom Island, the largest of the An Thoi island cluster to the south of Phu Quoc Island off the coast of the Mekong Delta’s Kien Giang province, will open on February 14, just before Tet. Invested by the Sun Group, its nearly 8-km length makes it the longest cable car in the world. Its 70 cars can carry 30 passengers each on a three-rope cable car technology known as 3S gondola, which is the safest and most modern in the world.

The trip provides a 360-degree of the islands and the sea. The cable car is the first and most important installation of the Sun World Hon Thom Nature Park in the southern reaches of Phu Quoc Island, another project from the Sun Group and that features a water park and entertainment park.

The cable car and the Sun World Hon Thom Nature Park will officially open to tourists on February 14, two days before Tet. Tickets for adults and children over 1.3 meters tall are VND500,000 ($22), while children from 1 meter to 1.3 meters tall pay VND350,000 ($15) and children under 1 meter travel for free. To mark the opening, a “buy 1 ticket get 1 free” offer is available to the first 500 visitors each day from February 18 to 22. A lucky draw will also be held, with smartphones, luggage and cable and food vouchers up for grabs.

The Sun Group has built many large real estate and tourism projects in Vietnam, including the world’s longest continuous mono-cable detachable gondola at Sun World Ba Na Hills in the central city of Danang, the world’s former longest 3S gondola at Mt. Fansipan in northern Lao Cai province, and the world’s tallest ropeway tower and largest ropeway cabin, the Ha Long Queen Cable Car, in Ha Long city. Situated in the Gulf of Thailand on the Vietnam-Cambodia-Thailand marine economic corridor, Phu Quoc is the country’s largest island and boasts a range of beautiful beaches.

Phu Quoc National Park, meanwhile, is home to hundreds of plant species, dozens of which are listed in the Vietnamese and world red books of endangered species. The park is part of the Kien Giang biosphere reserve, which was recognized as a World Biosphere Reserve by UNESCO in 2006. Phu Quoc Island welcomed nearly 362,000 international visitors last year, up 72 per cent against 2016, and targets at least half a million this year.” Source: vneconomictimes.com

Read more:
Intercontinental Phu Quoc Resort

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Sapa roof of Vietnam

Sapa roof of Vietnam: Just another reason to visit the roof of Vietnam, Sapa. Sapa in Vietnam’s northern province of Lao Cai has become more touristy in recent years, so it is important for those who love the pristine beauty of the town to find a place where they can breath in the fresh air, dive into the green jungle, gaze over the vast paddy fields and experience the ethnic culture.

Aware of that demand, National Geographic has the answer: Topas Ecolodge in Ban Lech Village. Naming the lodge on its new list of Unique Lodges of the World, the U.S.-based publisher suggests to its readers to “wake in the morning to the mist rising with the sun and spend your days exploring the surrounding forests and ethnic villages, and you’ll start to feel the pull of the hill tribes’ centuries-old lifestyle, native to these mountains and virtually untouched by the modern world.” This is because “the stilted common buildings at the heart of the lodge were sourced from a nearby community of ethnic Tay people; and private guest bungalows swirl along the ridgeline, ensuring a spectacular view no matter which one you check in to.”

Opened in 2005 on a mountaintop far from the emerging tourist hub of Sapa Town, Topas Ecolodge offers its guests a rare experience of culture, as there are five different native tribes in the region with distinctive languages and lifestyles. Surrounded by mountains and green rice paddies, the hilltop resort is the first in Vietnam and the 5th in Asia to make the National Geographic list. Last year, it was also ranked first by the site on the list of “21 places to stay if you care about the planet.” All of its 33 white bungalows overlook a spectacular landscape view of terraced rice fields and magnificent mountains, including the rooftop of Southeast Asia, Mount Fansipan. Other lodges in Asia that made the list are Sukau Rainforest Lodge in Malaysia, Three Camel Lodge in Mongolia, Twinkle Valley in China, and Zhiwa Ling Hotel in Bhutan.” Source: e.vnexpress.net

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Sapa Fansipan railway line

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Saigon nightlife

SAIGON NIGHTLIFE. HCM CITY. Nightlife in the megacity has something for everyone, be it partying hard or watching the skyline with a cocktail. Respected travel site Rough Guides just released a list of eight best night experiences in Southeast Asia, and Ho Chi Minh City is named THE place to delve into bars and clubs. “When the sun goes down, the bustling energy of southern Vietnam’s megalopolis transfers to its many clubs and bars,” Rough Guides says. If you’re thirsty for a chic experience of Saigon’s nightlife, put on your best dress or suit and head to the rooftop Chill Sky Bar in District 1, one of the city’s most popular and fancy spots.

It stays open from 5:30 p.m. till small hours the next morning, offering a dusk till dawn-ish view of the city, fabulous cocktails and a small but exciting music scene to check out. The U.K travel site also named Saigon Acoustic Bar in District 3 as a great rendezvous for a night out with pop-rock cover bands, while Carmen Bar in District 1 offers an odd selection of Spanish flamenco played by skilled Vietnamese musicians. For a casual good time, the plastic tables along Bui Vien are a must, Rough Guides said, calling it the “Beer Street” of the city’s backpacker district. Bui Vien is part of the city’s famous backpacker precinct that is closed to vehicles on weekends. It has drawn much attention from nomads with its bustling and energetic atmosphere, where they wander into the world of beer clubs, bars and pubs, shaking up the night in loud music, blink lights and cheers.

Other best night experiences in the region that are named on the list are music scene in Malaysia’s Kuala Lumpur and Sarawak, an overnight stay at Thailand’s most populous city The Big Mango or dance parties in Malaysia’s Penang. Or, visitors can grab a bite at Myanmar’s former capital Yangon, indulge in street life and live music at Yogyakarta’s Malioboro strip in Indonesia and dive into Singapore’s art hub Kampong Glam. Saigon, Vietnam’s biggest commercial center, is one of the most popular destinations in the country. Official data showed that it received 6.4 million foreign arrivals in 2017, a 22 percent pickup from the previous year. The city hopes to receive seven million foreign visitors this year.” Source: e.vnexpress.net

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HCMC coffee culture

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Vietnam pristine Cam Ranh Bay

Vietnam pristine Cam Ranh Bay: Cam Ranh Bay has been named among the world’s seven best destinations for May. Mesmerizing beaches and luxury resorts make a perfect combination for Cam Ranh, according to Condé Nast Traveler. If you are struggling with travel ideas for the summer, Vietnam can offer some help. The country’s deep-water Cam Ranh Bay, with its budding beach tourism, has been named among the world’s seven best destinations for May by top travel magazine Condé Nast Traveler.

Cam Ranh, an hour south of its much busier sister Nha Trang in the central province of Khanh Hoa, boasts pristine and mesmerizing beaches that have yet to be marred by human hands. It’s where one can find “the lifetime fascination” in the deep waters, the U.S.-based magazine said. Luxury facilities such as a top-tier golf course and beachfront resorts should be part of the package, it said.

Cam Ranh international airport is expected to unveil a new international terminal to bring in more overseas visitors to the country this May. The Condé Nast list also includes Paris, Sicily and Puglia of Italy, Portugal’s remote Azores islands, Cannes and Monte Carlo, San Francisco and Louisville. International visitor arrivals in Vietnam in the first quarter of this year jumped 30.9 percent from a year ago to 4.2 million. The country expects to receive 15-17 million foreign arrivals this year.” Source: e.vnexpress.net

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Anam Luxury Cam Ranh Resort
Travelodge Cam Ranh Hotel

Liveinmuine.com providing a reliable and affordable hotel transfer service. We operating all over Vietnam. You’ll get a direct door-to-door transfer directly to your destination. Whether it’s an airport, port, train station, town or city we have the right vehicle for you. So, tell us where and when you’d like to go, whatever time day or night our vehicles could be available to suit all your needs. Moreover, check also sightseeing tours, personal driver service, and Muine quality accommodation options. Thank you!